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began as a vision of Nina Laltrello, Marriage and Family Therapist and Certified Sex Addiction Therapist, in response to marriages and families she observed impacted by our changing world of technology. Her mission is to create a healing place for individual adults, adolescents, couples and families and offer cutting edge resources and information for families impacted in our digital world. Click here for information on problems we treat.

With a strong history of treating chemical addiction in families on two continents since 1995, she began to observe a more problematic pattern emerging in marriages and families:  the internet, mobile technology, and video gaming.  She observed the impact of Facebook and digital cheating in the clients who sought help for their marriages.  As parents would have concern about substance use by their children, Ms. Laltrello became more concerned for the dangerous activities these children engaged in on the internet unbeknownst to the parents who brought them for substance abuse screenings.


What Does Sex Addiction Treatment Look Like Part 4: Treatment Planning Is Not One Size Fits All

In parts one through three of this series, we have covered the different levels of care for addressing sex addiction. While these are the most common methods of treatment for sex addiction, it is certainly not an exhaustive list of all the components of treatment. Also, careful consideration should be made that the course of treatment is appropriate for each individual client.


In fact, an individual’s path to recovery is rarely this cut and dry. A Certified Sex Addiction Therapist (CSAT) can provide a thorough assessment to help determine the best and most appropriate recommendations for an individual. Considerations and discussion are necessary on what is realistic in terms of time constraints and financial considerations such as insurance. Although often a good option, there is no magic to “inpatient care”.  In many cases, it is not a consideration for clients due to time or financial constraints. In this case, clinicians may help build a level of support in an outpatient setting.  Other times, a client may not be ready to face the level of care really necessary to help them achieve sustained sobriety, and their outpatient therapist will continue to work with them to be able to do so. All in all, recovery is available at all levels of care. One course may be more difficult than others, but recovery is a personal choice, and can be obtained through any of these routes.

What Does Sex Addiction Treatment Look Like: Part 3: Outpatient Therapy

In this blog post, we are continuing our discussion of the different types of sex addiction treatment. So far, we have discussed Inpatient Rehabilitation and Intensive Outpatient (IOP) as different levels of care for sex addiction. (To read these posts check out Part 1 and Part 2). Now, in Part 3, we will cover outpatient therapy.

This is the least stringent level of care for sex addiction. This is a more typical format of therapy where an individual attends therapy sessions approximately once a week, and are also part of an ongoing therapy support group. For sex addiction, a structured, task centered approach is often used to guide the individual and/or group therapy process.

Additionally, individuals are encouraged to engage in several 12-step meetings per week that specifically pertain to sex addiction. Active participation in 12-step programming looks like regular attendance at meetings, having a sponsor, working on step assignments, and supporting other members of the 12-step community.

What Does Treatment for Sex Addiction Look Like Part 2: Intensive Outpatient Therapy

In this blog post, we continue our series on the different levels of care for sex addiction. In Part 1, we discussed the highest level of care for sex addiction – Inpatient Rehabilitation. Next, we will discuss the level of care that is a step down from inpatient/residential, and is referred to as Intensive Outpatient (IOP) therapy.

Intensive Outpatient (IOP) therapy comes in a couple of different formats. Many inpatient treatment programs are familiar with formalized IOP programs, and may make a recommendation for an individual to transition into that level of care following the completion of inpatient treatment. A formal IOP program includes daily group therapy and weekly individual therapy. When individuals are not in therapy, they are often required to volunteer or work part time while rigorously attending 12 step meetings. Additionally, they may be required to live in sober living housing affiliated with the IOP program. Sober living houses are places where everyone there is committed to working a recovery program, and they generally have guidelines for being able to reside in the house such as staying sober, attending 12 step meetings, and being in by a certain time in the evenings. Sober houses provide an opportunity for an individual to continue to be supported in their sobriety, but with less supervision than in an inpatient setting.


What Does Treatment for Sex Addiction Look Like Part 1: Inpatient/Residential (AKA Rehab)

People often ask the question about whether or not sex addiction really exists. Along with that, they also often ask what sex addiction rehab looks like, and how long it takes to recover. Because many people are familiar with rehab for chemical addictions such as alcohol and drugs, they often do not understand what that would look like for a process addiction, like sex addiction. So, this is the first of a four-part blog series written to clarify what sex addiction treatment looks like. The series will discuss the different levels of care available to those that struggle with sex addiction, what each level entails, how to know if it’s a good fit, and additional considerations.


How To "Be the Change" for Addiction in Your Area

If you scrolled past this post and thought, “oh, we really don’t have that problem in our area”, then this post is for you. Recently, local news featured a story exposing the significant drug problem, particularly related to the deadly drug Heroin, in some very affluent areas in metro Atlanta. As is often the case with these types of news specials and documentaries, the special was eye opening and left many viewers wondering what they could do to help. This blog post features a few suggestions as to what you, yes you, can do to promote change as it relates to addiction and other mental health issues in your community. 


1.            Acknowledge that there is a problem, even in your neighborhood. Addiction is not a disease that just affects certain people. The research and evidence consistently shows that individuals from a number of socioeconomic backgrounds are impacted by addiction. By acknowledging that there is a problem that exists and avoiding judgment among your own circles of friends, families, and coworkers you can promote change. 

The WHY of Addiction?

Probably one of the most common things I hear people say in regards to addiction is, I just don’t understand why they do it.” This is typically coming from the family member or friend who cannot seem to wrap their head around why someone would continue to engage in such harmful and self-destructive behavior.  From a non-addict perspective, asking this question makes a lot of sense. The answer, however, is multi-layered and multi-faceted. There is rarely one thing that answers the question as to why individuals continue to engage in addictive behavior.

In fact, we find that in working with those struggling with addiction there are often a combination of factors that lead them to try coping with their problems or emotions with addictive substances or processes. In order to help answer the question of “Why do they do it??”, here are a couple of common reasons why people engage in addictive behavior.

A Guide for Parents: Teenagers and Technology

      In the fast moving world of digital technology, parents are frantically searching for the latest information and how to keep their children safe online. Trying to keep up with all the latest trends can feel like a maze, and leave parents feeling dizzy.  In their dizziness, they may tend to go to extreme measures trying to do away with technology or lack concrete boundaries – just hoping for the best. While the tendency to resort to either of these options is tempting, we have compiled a list of our most commonly asked questions to help parents find a moderate answer to the challenges of technology with their teen or pre-teen. We hope these questions and answers help guide parents towards designing limits for technology that are appropriate for their unique families.

How do I protect my children when they are outside the home (e.g. someone else’s house)?


•       Let your kids know the expectations up front and remind them when they leave home.

•       Inform the other parents of your wishes and ask for their support

•       Have a rule that devices do not go to other families’ homes

•       Be prepared to follow through with consequences if the rules are not followed.


Increased Intimacy Through Couples Therapy

When we talk about intimacy most people think about sex, but that’s only one part of intimacy. Couples who say they want to know each other better are also seeking intimacy. True intimacy is achieved when you are able to see and be seen by another. I’ve often heard it said that the phrase “into me you see” is a great way to remember the concept of intimacy. In my work as both a couples and sex addiction therapist, I have helped many couples improve their connection and move into deeper intimacy.  Many couples report wanting to feel closer; this is true for couples who are just starting out, and event those who have been in a relationship for a long time.  They want to know each other’s dreams and desires  - all of which is part of intimacy. By using a technique that helps couples focus on identifying and communicating their emotions, I guide them in becoming more in tune with each other. When couples feel as though they are seen and heard in a relationship, then they are more likely to share their hopes, dreams, and desires. Couples that are early in their relationship can often save themselves some heartache. And after years together, many couples develop a new depth of knowledge of each other. If you love your partner dearly, but often wish you were closer, then couples therapy focused on intimacy building could be the next step to take to get you there. Wouldn’t it be nice to share the desires of your heart with your life partner?

Children Are Not Little Adults

After attending a host of holiday gatherings over the past few months, I started reflecting on a pattern I noticed of a lack of attention that being paid towards young children at some of these events. What I noticed was not that children were being overtly neglected, but that there seemed to be some odd expectation that they would behave like little adults while the actual adults got on with more important and mature matters.

This observation inspired my thinking process, and thus this blog post, about reasonable expectations for children.  The old saying that “children should be seen and not heard” is long since a thing of the past, and we have plenty of research to show that quite the opposite is true in terms of promoting their healthy development.

  • Children are meant to play. In this process, they are meant to explore, make messes, and be spontaneous. This means that they will jump from one thing to the next without thinking, and yes, without cleaning up. This process is critical to their development. Their brains are not developed enough to complete one task at a time, clean it up, and then neatly move on to another one. (Let’s be honest, some adults can’t even do this).